Message archive‎ > ‎

Self-Introduction / ごあいさつ

posted Aug 22, 2016, 12:00 AM by PARC Osaka University   [ updated Aug 22, 2016, 12:03 AM ]
My name is Kazuto Yamauchi and I am a new member at the Photonics Center. “Light” for me is X-rays and, therefore, I would like to describe some of the developments in X-ray optics while telling you a little about myself.
X-rays were discovered in 1895 by Wilhelm Röntgen. In 1912, less than twenty years later, Max von Laue discovered the diffraction of X-rays by zinc sulfide crystals, and the following year William H. and William L. Bragg, father and son, presented Bragg’s law. These brilliant achievements gave us light that enabled humans to see atoms, the greatest beneficiary of which is the field of crystal structure analysis. A hundred years later, the U.N. General Assembly proclaimed 2014 to be the International Year of Crystallography, showing just how much X-rays have contributed to crystallography. In the meantime, optics and crystallography have grown immensely, through mutual stimulation, and have dramatically improved the performance of light sources. Higher throughput has been the greatest need for crystal structure analysis, and particularly for the structural analysis of proteins. X-rays in the form of synchrotron radiation sources have shown rapid advancements in brilliance since around 1990. As a result, X-rays acquired the byproduct spatial coherence, which had not been particularly needed for crystal structure analysis, and a new discipline called coherent X-ray optics was born at synchrotron radiation facilities such as SPring-8. While it is somewhat misleading to say, their function as a tool for viewing matter may have brought X-rays back to the forefront of science.
I was a newcomer to the field at this time, working to develop mirrors based on precision machining and metrology for preserving coherence in the light source. We became the first in the world to successfully achieve diffraction-limited focusing and imaging. We also developed a technique for measuring wavefronts based on wave optics and an adaptive optical system for correcting deformations in the wavefronts, and achieved X-ray scanning microscopy with a sub-10 nm spatial resolution and coherent diffraction microscopy approaching a spatial resolution of 1 nm. I take great pride in having contributed in some small way to the advancement of X-ray microscopy based on synchrotron radiation.
Now, synchrotron X-rays have been successfully developed into an X-ray free-electron laser. X-ray FEL facilities are currently installed at two locations: the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in America and the Riken Harima Branch in Japan. These ultrashort pulse lasers produce wavelengths covering the hard X-ray region, with a pulse duration of femtoseconds. The peak intensity of the beam approaches 10 billion times that of SPring-8. It is a dream light source that is in the process of developing entirely new X-ray sciences. The X-ray mirrors fabricated with our method are called Osaka Mirrors and have been installed at both facilities in the U.S. and Japan. A venture company financed by Osaka University Venture Capital (OUVC) ships the mirrors worldwide, and advanced development of the mirrors is now undertaken by postdoctoral researchers.
Recently we succeeded in observing two-photon absorption with Japan’s X-ray FEL SACLA, using a beam focused down to 50 nm. K emissions were observed when exciting germanium with 5.6-keV X-rays. The intensity of the K fluorescence was essentially proportional to the square of the exciting X-ray intensity. Energy of 11.1 keV was necessary for exciting the Ge K-shell, and there was no intermediate state for two-stage excitation. In fact, the two 5.6 keV photons were absorbed simultaneously with no intermediate state, transferring 11.1 keV of energy to the K-shell electron. The second photon acts within a few hundred zeptoseconds from the first, before the ripples of the first photon have even subsided. This is the first observation of its kind in the X-ray region.
I have continued research on coherent X-ray optics and have been involved in the development of various X-ray devices. However, everything I have done to this point academically has been in optics rather than photonics. If it were not for X-ray FEL making nonlinear optics experiments possible in the X-ray region, I would have been hesitant to join the Photonics Center. This is an exciting area with boundless potential.
As a new member, I hope to contribute to research in photonics in the X-ray region, as well as in surface generation and the like for photonic materials using my specialty of precision machining. But I will cut my self-introduction off here before this gets too lengthy.

August 22, 2016
Kazuto Yamauchi, Professor
Division of Precision Science and Technology and Applied Physics
Graduate School of Engineering
Osaka University
 フォトニクスセンターのメンバーに新しく加わることになった山内です。私にとっての「光」はX線ですので、X線光学の発展に触れつつ、自己紹介をさせていただこうと思います。X線はレントゲンにより1895年に発見され、その後20年も経たぬ1912年にラウエが硫化亜鉛結晶からの回折現象を見出し、翌1913年にはブラッグ父子がブラッグの法則を発表しました。これらの偉業によって、人類は原子を見る光を手に入れることになります。そして、最もこの恩恵に与ったのが結晶構造解析の分野です。このときから100年目となる2014年を国連総会が国際結晶年に指定したことからも、X線が結晶学に如何に貢献したのかが分かります。この間、X線光学と結晶学は、お互いを強く刺激し合いながら大いに発展し、光源の性能も飛躍的に向上しました。結晶構造解析のハイスループット化は、特にタンパク質の構造解析では至上の要求であり、1990年頃から、放射光X線光源の高輝度化が急速に進むことになります。その結果、X線は、結晶構造解析にはあまり必要でなかった空間コヒーレンスを副産物として獲得することになり、新たな学問領域である「コヒーレントX線光学」がSPring-8などの放射光施設を舞台に誕生しました。若干の語弊がありますが、物質を見るツールとしての存在から、X線そのものが再び最先端のサイエンスの対象になったと言えます。
この頃に、私は新参者として、この分野に入りました。精密加工・計測学をベースに、光源のコヒーレンスを保存するミラーの開発に挑戦し、回折限界の条件での集光や結像に世界で初めて成功しています。また、波動光学にもとづく波面の計測法や、これを補正する補償光学システムなどを開発し、分解能sub-10nmの走査型X線顕微鏡や分解能1nmに迫るコヒーレント回折顕微鏡などを実現しました。放射光ベースのX線顕微法の高度化に多少なりとも貢献できたものと自負しております。
 さて、放射光X線はX線自由電子レーザーへと発展を遂げています。現在、米国のスタンフォード研究所と日本の理化学研究所播磨研究所の2ヶ所にこの施設があります。発振波長は硬X線領域をカバーする時間幅フェムト秒レベルの極短パルスレーザーです。ピーク強度はSPring-8の100億倍に迫ります。まさに、夢の光源であり、全く新しいX線科学が展開されつつあります。我々の方法で作製したX線ミラーは“OSAKA-Mirror”と呼ばれ、米国と日本の両方の施設にインストールされています。OSAKA-Mirrorは、大阪大学ベンチャーキャピタル(OUVC)が出資しているベンチャー企業から世界中に送り出されており、博士後期課程修了の学生が最先端の開発を担っています。
 最近、日本のX線自由電子レーザーであるSACLAの50nm集光ビームを使って、2光子吸収の観察に成功しました。5.6keVのX線でゲルマニウムのKα線が観察されたのです。Kα線の強度は基本的に励起X線強度の2乗に比例していました。GeのK殻の励起には11.1keVのエネルギーが必要であり、2段階励起をするための中間状態はありません。まさに、2つの5.6keVの光子が中間状態を介さず同時に吸収され、11.1keVのエネルギーをK殻電子に与えたことになります。1つ目の光子による細波が消えない数100ゼプト秒の時間内に2つ目の光子が作用しています。X線領域では初めての観察になりました。
 コヒーレントX線光学の研究を続け、色々なX線デバイスの開発に携わることができました。ただし、やってきたことは学術的にはオプティクス(光学)そのものであり、フォトニクスではありません。これだけですと、フォトニクスセンターのメンバーに加わることは憚られたのですが、X線自由電子レーザーは、X線領域での非線形光学実験を可能にしました。奥が深く、エキサイティングです。
新メンバーとして、X線領域でのフォトニクスや、元々の専門であった精密加工によるフォトニクス材料の表面創成などで貢献できればと考えています。長々と書きましたが、まずは、自己紹介まで。

2016年8月22日
山内 和人  教授
大阪大学大学院工学研究科
精密科学・応用物理学専攻

Comments