Message archive‎ > ‎

Admiring stars/私の趣味

posted Jan 24, 2017, 3:48 PM by PARC Osaka University   [ updated Jan 24, 2017, 3:54 PM ]

I love to “let others look at” stars.

The beginning of my interest in “looking at” stars was the astronomical telescope my grandfather bought for me when I was in the second year of junior high school. On the day the astronomical telescope arrived, I took it outside and tried to focus on the brightest star in the sky right away. It was really difficult for me to adjust the telescope at first. No sooner had I finally made it than I realized that the star had rings around it. It was Saturn. How pretty it was, I was amazed, and thought I saw something important. The time was probably about 8pm. I would have looked at the moon, if there had been the moon. Instead, Saturn was shining in the southeast. Just recently I checked with an astronomy simulation software and found out that was in mid October of 1968.

Saturn I saw that night surely ushered me into the world of stars later in my life. In 1968, a year prior to the first moon landing of the mankind, Apollo 8 became the first manned spacecraft which orbited the moon and returned safely to Earth. The spacecraft back from 380,000 km away reentered the atmosphere of Earth at a speed of 10km per second. They said the spacecraft must reenter the atmosphere in a certain angle with an allowable error range of 2degree. If the angle was deeper, the spacecraft would be burned down, and, if shallower, it would be bounced back. I remember I was so thrilled with the television coverage of Apollo 8.

As a child, I wondered if I could see the Apollo spacecraft orbiting the moon through my telescope. There is no way, definitely, for my telescope could only distinguish craters of 4km in diameter of the moon surface. Strange to say though, I felt like I was able to see the spacecraft. The actual moon through the telescope showed me something much more than what it looked, and that was so different from the moon in a photograph.

As I grew older, stars more and more intrigued me. I have been all the way to New Zealand to see the stars in the southern hemisphere, and to the tip of California Peninsula to see the total solar eclipse.

Now my friends and I hold star-viewing gatherings on a monthly basis at the Floating Garden Observatory on the top of the New Umeda Sky Building. We give a talk about stars which can be seen on the day, as well as some topics on astronomy or space. Three or four astronomical telescopes are brought to the venue. Most of the participants are so impressed and raise cheers to see stars and planets through the telescope for the first time in their life.

This is how I changed from just “looking at” stars on my own to “letting others to look at” stars.

The moon light we now see is in fact the light of the sun reflected 1.3 seconds ago. The actual photons departed from the moon surface come into our eyes through the telescope, stimulate the retinal cells, and convey the visual image to the brain. In this system, I believe, something happens more than just a visible image. I guess this somehow explains why the vision through the telescope fascinates the participants.

The light wavelength our eyes can detect is approximately from 400nm in blue to 700nm in red. Light, in a broad meaning, is called electromagnetic waves, which also include these invisible light; X rays, gamma rays, IR rays, radio waves and many other. Although the invisible light has led us to various scientific discoveries and inventions, the visible light, which we can sense directly, stirs our imagination and creativity much more than that.

Thus, that is the theme of “Photonics”, in my own interpretation. Maybe my life has long been connected to the Photonics Center. I will try best to be able to contribute the Center.

January 25th, 2017

Hiroshi  Osumi, Photonics Center

私の趣味は、星を「見せる?」ことです。

星を「見る」ことに興味を持ったのは、中学2年生の時、祖父に買ってもらった天体望遠鏡がきっかけでした。天体望遠鏡が家に届いたその日の夜、早速庭に持ち出しました。とにかく一番明るく輝いている星を、苦心惨憺なんとか視野に入れてピントを合わせた瞬間、その星には輪が付いていました。土星だったのです。なんと可愛らしい、大切なものを見た気がしました。時刻はおそらく20時前後、月が出ていれば先ず月を見たはずですが、月は無かったと思います。土星は、南東方向に明るく輝いていたので、最近、天文ソフトでシミュレーションしてみると、どうやら196810月中旬のことだったようです。

土星を見た感動が、その後、私を星に引き付けることになりました。その年は、人類初の月面着陸の前年ですが、アポロ8号が初めて有人で月の裏側を周って帰って来ました。38kmの彼方から戻って来る宇宙船は、秒速約10kmもの猛スピードで大気圏に突入します。当時、大気圏への進入の許容角度は2度ほどで、それより深くなると燃え尽き、浅いと大気の層で跳ね返されると報道されていました。テレビの中継に、翌年の月面着陸に勝るとも劣らない興奮を覚えたことを覚えています。

月を望遠鏡で眺めていると、子供心に周回しているアポロ宇宙船が見えないかなぁと思ったりしましたが、私の望遠鏡の分解能では、月面で直径4kmのクレーターがやっと見分けられるくらいです。宇宙船は見えるはずがありません。

しかし、私の頭の中では、月を周回するアポロ宇宙船の姿が見えているようでした。

写真で見る月とはちがう、自分の目で見た実際の月の像は、そこに見えている以上のものを見せてくれているようでした。

その後、ニュージーランドに南天の星を見に行ったり、カリフォルニア半島の先端まで皆既日食を見に行ったりと、すっかり星のとりこになりました。

今、私は毎月、梅田スカイビル屋上の空中庭園で、仲間と一緒に「星の観望会」を開催しています。今夜の星空の解説と天文や宇宙の話題などを織り交ぜた解説を聞いて頂き、屋上では天体望遠鏡を34台出して来場者の皆さんに月や惑星などを眺めて頂いています。ほとんどの方が、天体望遠鏡をのぞいたことが無いということで、月のクレーターや土星の輪、木星の衛星などに歓声をあげて驚かれます。

昔は、自分で星を「見る」ことが趣味でしたが、今では、人に星を「見せる」ことになっています。

我々が見ている月の光は、1.3秒ほど過去に月面で反射した太陽光です。その月を出発した実際のフォトンが望遠鏡を通して目に入り、網膜の細胞を刺激して月の映像を脳に生じさせます。ここに、目に見えている以上の何かが生じるような気がします。だからこそ、天体望遠鏡を初めてのぞいた方々に感動を与え、歓声が上がるのでしょう。

私たちの目に見える光の波長は、約400nmの青から700nmの赤までです。光と同じ、いわゆる電磁波と呼ばれるものには、X線やガンマ線、赤外線、電波など我々の目に見えないものも多く存在します。

目には見えない「光」でも、それぞれの波長の特性を活かして、人間は様々な科学的発見をしてきました。

しかし、目に見える波長の光を使って、私たちが「直に感じる」行為は、それ以上の想像力や創造力を掻き立ててくれる気がします。

まさに、そのテーマが「フォトニクス」なのではないかと、自分なりに解釈しています。

フォトニクスセンターにお世話になったのも何かの縁かと思います。私なりにできることを精いっぱいさせて頂きたいと考えています。

2017年1月25日

フォトニクスセンター 大角泰史

Comments